October 9, 2018

Who’s Who and What’s What

Dakota

Dakota

DAKOTA is every girl, every boy, every kid. All of us.

The “parts” inside Dakota’s mind are examples of the idea that we all have many aspects of ourselves inside. Some hold our feelings and decisions about the world from the many experiences we’ve had. For example, here is a decision Dakota made at four years old: Clowns are truly dangerous because they look so weird and scary.

Others parts represent roles or jobs we have in life, like son or daughter, student, artist or athlete, defender or hider. Still others represent judgments we have about ourselves or we’ve adopted from what others have labeled us, like “Smart”, “Slow”, “Lazy” or “Hyper”. It is important to accept each of our parts, though it might be very helpful to give them new jobs or different names!

Kid Dakota or The Kid represents the part of our subconscious mind that is curious, capable and always willing to help. We need to communicate with this part of us. The Kid is awesome.

L’l D represents a younger part of us inside who has been hurt or frightened in some way. We need to treat this part of us as we would any little child – gently, with care and compassion.


Auntie Pono

Auntie Pono

Auntie Pono represents all the aunties and uncles who have passed on the ancient Hawaiian wisdom through the years. In Hawaiian culture, kids call older folk “auntie” or “uncle” to show respect and because they understand that they are cared about just as if they were family. In this story Auntie Pono is Dakota’s guide.


Breeze

Breeze

Breeze represents our observing self, the spiritual part of us that just witnesses what is going on without making judgments. Our observing self lives in the present moment and doesn’t feel sadness, anger or resentment. When we are in contact with this part of ourselves, we make fewer decisions based on “right” or “wrong”, “good” or “bad”.

Our witness helps us stay clear headed without letting our stuck feelings and thoughts muck up our mind. The more we can see things through the eyes of our observing self, the more clearly we can see the big picture.


Imp

Imp

Imp represents our imagination. The imagination is like a sixth sense that creates images and ideas. Possibly the most important job of our imagination is to be able to put ourselves in someone else’s place. In this way we feel empathy and compassion for others.

The imagination is a big part of how we can figure out ways to make what we do better and easier. Because our imagination has no limits, it can be both a source of real enjoyment and unnecessary pain.

Scientist tell us that our imagination is processed in the Neocortex (which is the snaky-looking part of the brain on top and is just in mammals) and the Thalamus (part of the front of the brain) where nerve impulses are received and sent on to where they need to go.


Thynk

Thynk
Thynk represents our thinking mind, the part of us that works to make sense of the world. Throughout history, from the great thinkers of philosophy, biology, psychology and artificial intelligence, there have been many very different ideas of what thinking is exactly.

Often, the thoughts we have come spontaneously, out of the blue and without a plan. But we can also use our thoughts consciously to achieve our goals of getting what we need or want.

Thynk represents our thinking mind, the part of us that works to make sense of the world. Throughout history, from the great thinkers of philosophy, biology, psychology and artificial intelligence, there have been many very different ideas of what thinking is exactly.

Often, the thoughts we have come spontaneously, out of the blue and without a plan. But we can also use our thoughts consciously to achieve our goals of getting what we need or want.


The conscious mind (uhane in the Hawaiian language) or, in this book, the Realm of Awareness, is our normal state when we are aware of what’s happening. This is where we do most of our thinking. Along with the imagination, our conscious and abstract thoughts also come from the neocortex and thalamus.

The subconscious mind (unihipili), here, the Realm of All Possibilities, is not separate from the conscious mind but we can considered it to be a part of the mind that is deeper and more powerful. Some people think of our subconscious mind as a great mental sea of life, energy and power, but, so far, scientists have not been able to measure it.

Our subconscious mind holds the controls for all the natural functions of our bodies, such as our heartbeat, our digestion, our blood circulation and our ability to heal ourselves. Involuntary actions, as well, come from our subconscious.

We may consciously tell ourselves what we want but it is usually necessary for us to get help from our subconscious before we can achieve it. Our subconscious mind is always ready to take suggestions from us. This is why it is in our best interest to have thoughts that remind us that we are meant to accept ourselves just as we are in any moment. Of course, we can always make improvements. The more we practice positive thinking, the more our subconscious mind will fill us with positive feelings and we can make positive changes.

The Superconscious Mind (Aumakua), Inner Divinity, or Higher Self are ways to describe the part of us that has never forgotten that we are not separate from Divinity (or God or Love, etc.). In Dakota’s story, this part is called Beyond the Beyond. The more we allow this part of our mind to be present in our consciousness, the easier it is to let things come and go without getting stuck. And the more we let go, the easier it is enjoy the company of our Superconscious.
The more we pay attention to the non-judgmental attitude of our observing self, the easier it is for our superconscious and conscious minds to communicate. As we grow we can begin to take complete responsibility for the negative, useless thoughts and feelings we have. We can be aware that they are there only because we have held on to them in our conscious mind.